Articles

European Literature Days 2016: Review of Mathias Enard

Posted by Beat Mazenauer | | filed under: ,

The two main characters, Sarah and Franz, meet at Schloss Hainfeld*, which 180 years ago was home to the Orientalist Joseph von Hammer-Purgstall. Both protagonists ...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Ulrike Guérot

Posted by Katja Petrovic | | filed under: ,

All those who may now feel caught in a dreadful predicament – on the one hand, wanting to embrace the necessity of a united Europe, while on the other no longer finding any arguments to defend the EU ...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Peeter Helme

Posted by Klaus Bittner | | filed under: ,

What happens when two people meet, look at each other and know that from now on they will stay together, that they want to talk, to be intimate and to love each other? ...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Rasha Khayat

Posted by Beat Mazenauer | | filed under: ,

The favourite prediction about the ‘conflict of cultures’ is an ideological construct that quickly loses obvious meaning when applied to everyday life. Rasha Khayat concentrates on this theme in her ...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Tim Parks

Posted by West Camel | | filed under: ,

A central image in E.M. Forster’s A Passage to India is the echo experienced in the Marabar Caves...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Jonas Lüscher

Posted by Beat Mazenauer | | filed under: ,

Culture is a thin varnish covering the chasms of barbarianism. Disasters churn it up; they are the well-spring of contradictions: collective solidarity and unconventional force. Jonas Lüscher’s much ...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Hans Christoph Buch

Posted by Beat Mazenauer | | filed under: ,

In the books written by Hans Christoph Buch, the sun often gleams from a blank sky...

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European Literature Days 2016: Review of Najem Wali

Posted by Beat Mazenauer | | filed under: ,

In “The Invisible Cities” (“Le Città invisibili”), Italo Calvino wrote, “The hell of the living is not something that will be”. It is already here; it takes on real contours...

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